Some Particulars about CPI(ML)-Liberation

Members of the Political Bureau : 1. Vinod Mishra, General Secretary 2. Raghu, Chairman, Central Control Commission 3. Nagbhushan Pattnaik, President of IPF 4. Ramnaresh Ram, in-charge, peasant front 5. Sankar Mitra, central spokesperson 6. Arindam Sen, editor, Liberation 7. Dipankar Bhattacharya, OGS, IPF Central Publications : Liberation, central organ in English, published every two months by Arup Pal,

CPI(ML)-Liberation : TRUE INHERITOR OF INDIA’S REVOLUTIONARY COMMUNIST LEGACY

In view of the facts that the CPI(ML)-Liberation is the only CPI(ML) group (a) which has maintained its continuity and unity since its reorganisation in 1974; (b) which has got an all-lndia organisational network covering Assam, Tripura, West Bengal southern Orissa (Koraput-Ganjam area), coastal Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, southern Kerala, Bangalore, Bombay,

FRATERNAL TIES BASED ON SELF-RELIANCE AND MUTUAL NON-INTERFERENCE

THE party has maintained close fraternal relations with the Communist Party of Nepal (Marxist-Leninist) from the mid-70s onward. These relations have been based upon the spirit of mutual respect and learning from each other while strictly maintaining the policy of mutual noninterference and our commitment to opposing all expressions of

MULTIFARIOUS ACTIVITIES AND GROWING RESUMPTION OF OPEN PARTY PRACTICE

To take up the challenge of defending Marxism-Leninism in the face of the continuing deep crisis of socialism and renewed bourgeois offensive, the party in its July 1990 Special Conference in Delhi has decided to resume open functioning after nearly twenty years. Accordingly, its central and state organs have started

GRASPING THE BASIC DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE CPI(M) AND CPI(ML)

IT may be useful here to reiterate the basic differences between the CPI(M) and our party. The opportunist course in the Indian communist movement is identified first by its characterisation of the Indian bourgeoisie. In the garb of various kinds of jugglery of words and phrases, it essentially emphasises the

FOURTH PARTY CONGRESS AND THE CALL FOR LEFT CONFEDERATION

THE Fourth Party Congress was held in January 1988 in a village in Hazaribagh district of Bihar. In keeping with the changing situation and its own enhanced understanding, the party radically revised various outdated ideas and stereo-typed positions, thus clearing the way for entering and reshaping the mainstream of Indian

FORMATION OF IPF : A NEW LEAP IN POLITICAL ASSERTION

MEANWHILE, the party had started feeling a desperate need for asserting its presence in the national political scene. In the wake of the failure of the first non-Congress experiment at the Centre and the restoration of the Indira regime, there had begun a national debate on a national political alternative

DRAWING NEW STRENGTH THROUGH RECTIFICATION OF OLD MISTAKES

IN 1978, the party launched a rectification movement. It had all begun with the limited purpose of correcting just the style of work, but the spirit of rectification did not spare the political line. Great changes began to occur in the party line and practice which were formalised in

THE MID-70S : KEEPING THE PARTY ALIVE AMIDST SPLITS AND CONFUSION

In the middle of 1972 the party had suffered almost a total paralysis. The entire central leadership was virtually decimated. The remaining party forces were all lying scattered and fragmented. And on the question of the party's line, there was confusion all around. At this juncture, a new Central Committee

EMERGENCE OF THE CPI(ML) : THE OPENING UP OF A NEW ROAD

IN the course of a protracted struggle between its opportunist and revolutionary wings, the Communist Party of India underwent its first split in 1964 and a new party was formed in the shape of the Communist Party of India (Marxist). It did not however take long for the revolutionary wing